What Do These Two Women Have in Common?

While conducting research into the history of U.S. expansion into the Mexican North, I came across two compelling protagonists whose differences were more instructive than their similarities. The first, Ricarda León Flores, was a young girl during the early Mexican Revolution. León Flores lived in the Yaqui pueblos in Sonora, Mexico, where she led a life shaped by migration and by indigenous and Mexican cultures.

 Ricarda León Flores (seated) with her first cousin Manuela, ca. 1925. Illustration in Juan Silverio Jaime León,  Testimonios de Una Mujer Yaqui  (n.p., 1998), 77.

Ricarda León Flores (seated) with her first cousin Manuela, ca. 1925. Illustration in Juan
Silverio Jaime León, Testimonios de Una Mujer Yaqui (n.p., 1998), 77.

The second woman, Marjorie Van Meter, lived in Sonora, too, for a brief time in 1913. She joined her brother, employed by the Southern Pacific (of Mexico), on a kind of working vacation south of the border. Van Meter, an Iowan from Belle Plaine, taught school to mostly American children, and thereby recreated a U.S. world in the company town of Empalme.

 Marjorie Van Meter, 1913, Howard Van Meter Pictorial Collection, 1905–1914. Courtesy of Center for Southwest Research, University of New Mexico.

Marjorie Van Meter, 1913, Howard Van Meter Pictorial Collection, 1905–1914. Courtesy
of Center for Southwest Research, University of New Mexico.

Though these women inhabited the same geography at the same time (Empalme was only about 40 miles from the Yaqui pueblos), they never met nor knew of each other, though both of their lives were shaped by capitalist expansion and gendered networks.

For León Flores, she and her mother had to migrate to southern Mexico to avoid intense persecution by the Mexican Government. Why? Officials coveted Yaqui lands as a way to encourage and protect U.S. investments in the region. Between 1903 and 1908, the Government led a campaign of ethnic cleansing, removing Yaquis to Yucatán, among other places, clearing the lands for foreign irrigation enterprises. (In fact, the Boer emigrants in my previous posts first considered settling on Yaqui lands, before they ultimately chose to relocate in Chihuahua.) As a result, León Flores' and others' lives were difficult and ever mobile; they nevertheless managed to maintain a sense of "home" among the Sonoran Yaqui pueblos through the years of harshest treatment.

For Van Meter, she experienced Sonora on a lark, more or less, attempting to find employment and adventure for a time while accompanying her brother. Her ability to decide when to go to Mexico, and when to leave, in itself demonstrates the power differential that separated these two women. When the Revolution again flared in 1913, Van Meter lived for a time on "El Morrito," a beach near Empalme, residing in a railroad car (protected by the Southern Pacific) during the evening, enjoying the tides during the day.

As different as these two women's lives were, they both played a small part (one affected by, the other contributing to) in a similar historical process--the U.S. capitalist development of the Mexican North--that shaped countless lives, albeit in strikingly different ways.

For more on the resonances and dissonances between the lives of León Flores and Van Meter, see an article I published a few years ago. These two women also make brief cameos in my forthcoming book.